Academic Courses

Listed are credit-bearing courses with learning goals linked to civic engagement and social responsibility. Courses are listed by discipline with one sentence description of CESR component and any CBL component.

Architecture | Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences | Science | Engineering | Management
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
Design
“Architecture Design 1” – ARCH 2210
Design studio introducing students to the processes of critical inquiry specifically as it relates to architecture investigations. These processes are seen as interrelated and always informed by the societal, technological, and historical contexts within which architects work. – (This course investigates downtown Troy as a site for a public cultural institute)
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
Design
“Architecture Design 2“ – ARCH 2220
A continuation of the pursuit of architecture as critical inquiry within a broad societal context. Instruction integrates considerations of drawing, computers, and construction with design projects. – ( Project focuses on an institutional / public building engaged with its community)
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
Design
“Architecture Design 3” – ARCH 2230
Architecture Design Studio 3 develops practices that focus on the relationship between specific architectural design situations and issues of representation; conceptual, analytical, and critical thinking; ethical dilemmas; and the role that technical issues play in space-making. – (Project focuses on Multi-family housing)
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
Design
“Architecture Design 4” – ARCH 4240
(Urban Design Studio) An upper level design studio emphasizing the interacting combinations of dynamic influences arising from both global and local scales in the design of portions of the urban landscape, usually including some substantial housing component. (Students select this studio with specific theme – ranges from local to Urban)
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
Design
“Architecture Design 5/6” – ARCH 4250/60
A series of upper-level design studios that focus on significant concerns in architecture. (Includes foreign travel studios in China, India, Italy)
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
Design
“B.Arch. Final Project 1” – ARCH 4980
In the context of a faculty directed design research area, students initiate, research, and plan a comprehensive project that creatively engages the material inhabited world.
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
Design
“B.Arch. Final Project 2” – ARCH 4990
The final phase of B.Arch. Final Project culminates in a comprehensive investigation manifested in a design project that engages the material inhabited world.
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
History, Theory, Criticism
“The Building and Thinking of Architecture 1” – ARCH 2110
This course addresses the history of architectural and related developments in selected Western and non-Western civilizations to construct a conceptual and strategic understanding of the relationships between architecture, geography, culture, technology, and thought.
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
History, Theory, Criticism
“The Building and Thinking of Architecture 2” – ARCH 2110
This course expands upon notions introduced in ARCH 2110 that architecture is a practice embedded in human cultures characterized by particular ways of thinking in action. In addition, notions that its domain of interests, physically and intellectually, extends beyond the limits of individual buildings are elaborated through specific examples. This is done against the background of the major shift in intellectual developments beginning in the 17th century that provide stimulus for the scientific, cultural, technological, and social revolutions of the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries.
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
History, Theory, Criticism
“The Building and Thinking of Architecture 3” – ARCH 2140
This course builds on the content and ideas of ARCH 2110 and 2120 to examine the history of architecture in medieval and Renaissance periods of Western civilization. In doing so it will examine the implications of these developments for the architecture of later eras as well as the chronology of specific important events in the time period from the 9th to the 17th centuries.
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
History, Theory, Criticism
“Cities/Lands“ – ARCH 4040
This lecture-seminar is an examination of the parallel historical formation and operation of human settlements together with the territories associated with them, and the interrelations among them in Western Europe, North America, China, the Middle East, and North Africa. The purpose is to better understand the role spatial organization plays in the construction of social practices, human subjectivities, and technologies of power. While the differing paradigmatic notions of architectural and landscape practices will be explored in each cultural situation, the emphasis will be on the formative processes operating at all scales and among scales, and the more general design practices that have emerged, and could emerge, from these understandings.
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
History, Theory, Criticism
“Modernity in Culture and Architecture” – ARCH 4140
An exploration of the idea of modernity as both a cultural phenomenon (extending back to Enlightenment ideas of progress, technological enframing of the world, scientific rationality, historical consciousness, etc.) and as an artistic/architectural discourse unfolding in the 20th century as a radical requestioning of all traditional concepts of program, construction, and aesthetics.
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
History, Theory, Criticism
“Case Studies: Investigations into Architectural Knowledge” – ARCH 4690Buildings embody cultural knowledge. Their forms and spaces are invested with traces of habitation and beliefs through the employment of materials that are wrought by craft and technology. It is the intention of this course to teach how to investigate buildings in order to reveal the technological and cultural knowledge that is embedded within them.
Courses are listed by discipline with one sentence description of CESR component and any CBL component.
Architecture | Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences | Science | Engineering | Management
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Arts 
“Music and Sound” – ARTS 1010 
This course, which is the prerequisite for further courses in music theory and in computer music, is an introduction to the materials of music. Using a variety of examples from classical, popular, and non-western music, the class will introduce concepts of melody, harmony, rhythm, and musical form. Students will use their laptop computers for aural skills practice, notation, and basic recording exercises. Although no musical experience is required for this course, sight singing is one of the important skills to be developed.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Arts 
“Intermediate Digital Imaging” – ARTS 2040 
Intermediate Digital Imaging is a hands-on studio course exploring the use of computer technologies in making visual art. A study of contemporary issues in digital media and photography facilitates individual innovation and experimentation. Digital imaging and input/output techniques are employed in terms of giving visual form to ideas and personal expression in private and public settings.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Arts 
“Jazz Ensemble” – ARTS 2330 
Readings, rehearsals, and performances of jazz compositions ranging from the traditional jazz canon to pieces from contemporary composers/arrangers.  Preparation and attendance at rehearsals and all performances expected.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Arts 
“World Music” – ARTS 2520 
From “raves” to symphony hall, Indian film music to Tibetan chant, monster truck rallies to a mother’s lullaby, musical soundscapes surround us through all aspects of our daily lives. This course focuses on the study of music in or as culture. The exploration of music in human life will be comparative, using case studies from diverse world traditions and examining topics such as: ritual, media and technology, ethnicity/identity, music and dance, and musical transmission.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Arts 
“Art History I: From Paleolithic to Renaissance” – ARTS 2530 
This course is a survey of the visual arts from the Paleolithic to the Renaissance era. Nearly 500 images are analyzed according to style, time, place, and character. Relationship of art to ritual, magic, religion, philosophy, literature, and music are examined. Material is presented in a form accessible to students without previous knowledge of Art History.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Arts 
“The Multimedia Century” – ARTS 2540
This course will survey the history and theory of the diverse artistic practices of the twentieth century in relation to the development of the mass media and new technologies. Topics will include the Bauhaus, Surrealism, Pop Art, and Postmodernism and will span a spectrum of media from the more traditional, such as painting and photography, to electronic and new media, such as video and digital arts. This is a communication-intensive course.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Arts 
“Art, Community, and Technology” – ARTS 4080 
Through direct experience in the community, this course explores the complex roles and relationships of art, education, and technology. Students will develop a plan to work with a media arts center, community organization, or school; final teams will produce real-world arts and education projects that ultimately will be realized as significant additions to their professional portfolio.  The projects can include a range from traditional arts practice to creative writing, creative IT models, to community art and activism.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Arts 
“Experimental Game Design” – ARTS 4510 
Experimental Game Design is an upper level studio arts course focusing on the creation of innovative, workable game prototypes using a variety of interactive multimedia. Games are considered as a new genre and are analyzed as cultural artifacts. The aesthetics of game design including character development, level design, game play experience, and delivery systems are covered. Flow, game theory, and game play gestalt are considered. Alternate gaming paradigms and emerging forms are encouraged.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Arts 
“Creative Collaborations” – ARTS 6965/4965 
If you are a musician work with a video artist. If you are an engineer work with an artist. If you are a programmer work with a performance artist. Mix and match and create artistic projects by combining disciplines and presenting your work. Use any media, mobile devices, computers, cameras, video, painting, acoustic music varieties, and ways of working. All disciplines considered.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Cognitive Science 
“Introduction to Philosophy” – PHIL  1110 
An introduction to the major areas of philosophy (ethics, theory of knowledge, philosophy of religion, etc.) and to some of the main problems treated within these fields. Selections from contemporary as well as classical authors are studied and discussed. Students are encouraged to develop a disciplined approach to intellectual problems.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Cognitive Science 
“Ethics” – PHIL 4240 
A critical examination of traditional and contemporary works in ethical theory by considering what these theories have to say about how we should live, what rights and obligations we have, what things are intrinsically valuable. Typically this includes such topics as ethical and cultural relativism, egoism, freedom, and responsibility. Often the focus will be on contemporary issues such as war, abortion, equality, or punishment.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Cognitive Science 
“Social and Political Philosophy” – PHIL 4220 
An exploration of such concepts as freedom, rights, and consent and their interrelationship; and a consideration of their bearing on questions of justice, law, and human welfare.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Cognitive Science 
“Critical Thinking” – PHIL 2100/PSYC 2100 
Critical thinking helps students to identify, analyze, and evaluate various patterns of reasoning as they occur in the real world, and reveal their potential pitfalls. The course also explores the reliability of other grounds of belief, such as perception, judgment, experts, authorities, rhetoric, and the media. Finally, the course covers some basic psychology and sociology of reasoning and belief to explain why people come to hold bad beliefs. The course emphasizes real life application.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Psychology/Cognitive Science 
“Stress and the Brain” – PSYC 4610/COGS 4610 
This seminar course is a detailed examination of the mind-brain relationship, through study of the stress response. Stress is simply defined as any challenge to an individual’s homeostasis, or balance. This course will explore the neurobiological underpinnings of the stress response, with particular focus on how stressors can alter perception, affective and cognitive processing in the individual, which can in turn feedback to alter the general health of the individual (body and mind/brain).
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Psychology/Cognitive Science 
“Social Psychology” – PSYC 2730 
This is a survey course covering theories, methods, and empirical research on personal and situational factors influencing social behavior. Topics covered include social perception, the construction of social reality, decision making, group influences on behavior, and attitudes. This is a communication-intensive course.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Psychology/Cognitive Science 
“Experimental Methods and Statistics” – PSYC 4310 
This course provides an introduction to basic methods of psychological research and the use of statistics to analyze and interpret psychological data. Topics include experimental methods and research design, data collection and analysis, and written communication of results. Students will also gain proficiency with SPSS software. Each student will be expected to propose and carry out a research project and prepare a formal report that comports with formatting guidelines promulgated by the American Psychological Association.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Psychology/Cognitive Science 
“Psychology and the Law” – PSYC 4740 
Since the 1950’s, social science researchers have turned their attention to the courtroom, in order to test theories of human behavior in a real world application. Are the basic assumptions underlying the practice of law in this country valid, given what psychologists know about the fundamentals of human behavior? This course will provide students with instruction regarding how the study of psychology can contribute to a better understanding of the legal system.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“Introduction to Communication Theory” – COMM 1510 
This course introduces students to basic topics in communication theory, including interpersonal, small group, organizational, and mass communication. Students will study a variety of theories related to these topics and will also study the cultural impact of new communication technologies and contemporary media systems
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“History and Culture of Games” – COMM 1600 
This course surveys 5000 years of game history, from ancient Sumeria to the latest next-generation consoles and MMOGs. In parallel with this historical tour, several major theories will be examined about the nature of play and the nature of games. Along the way we will also look at how games and play influence the cultures they are found in, and how culture in turn influences how people structure their leisure time will also be considered.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“Perspectives on Photography” – COMM 2410 
This course helps students understand the meaning and emotional complexity of visual images in our culture. Students examine photographic imagery through three perspectives. The first—formal—addresses the design components of the image, such as vantage point and contrast. The second—psychodynamic—concerns the emotional dynamics of viewing. The third—social political— explores photographs as instruments for preserving or challenging cultural values. No technical knowledge of photography is needed.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“Documentary Film” – COMM 2440 
Does documentary film depict reality, or is it just another form of storytelling? This course takes a broad, historical look at documentary media, exposing students to a wide range of works that in some sense stand on claims to truth. Students are invited to develop a critical stance toward documentary modes of social representation, through viewing and analyzing colonial photography and cinema, ethnographic, propaganda, cinema verite, experimental, and even “fake” documentaries. This is a communication-intensive course.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“Studio Design in Human-Computer Interaction” – COMM 4180/6810 
In this course, students work on collaborative projects to design human-computer interactions (HCIs) aimed at transforming people’s everyday practices. Students work with activity analysis, object-oriented modeling, and UI prototyping. Additional assignments required for students at the 6000 level. The 6000 level course serves as the capstone in the HCI MS Certificate.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“Sustainable Graphic Design” – COMM 4310 
This course is designed to introduce students to ideas and practices of sustainability in visual communications.  Sustainable graphic design is the consideration of environmental, cultural and physical impacts of graphic design products throughout their lifecycle.  Designers engaged in sustainable practice use techniques, processes and materials to reduce the detrimental environmental, social and economic impacts of their designs. They raise awareness and act as exemplars of sustainable practice for their clients, their peers and their community.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“Graphic Design for Corporate Identity” – COMM 4370 
This course examines historical and modern visual communication symbols in relationship to a company or organization’s overall industry and marketplace identity. Through a participatory design practice, students explore processes relative to the dissemination of consistent visual and verbal information. The semester long project results in creating a brand identity system and graphic standards manual for a local non-profit or small business in need of branding and marketing materials.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“Cross-Cultural Media: Analysis and Application” – COMM 4400/6400 
What role does culture play in visual communication across media? This course surveys perspectives from interdisciplinary discourse on what constitutes culture and its impact on meaning. Through readings on theory and criticism and analyses of existing media and research-generated data students gain an understanding of what constitutes cultural difference and how to communicate visually across cultures.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“Foundations of HCI Usability” – COMM 4420 
In this course, students will consider methods of gathering users’ requirements for product functions and information, ways to test products and information for usability and suitability, and procedures for incorporating the results learned through testing. Students will design and conduct usability tests on products, documents, and interfaces of interest.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“Media and Popular Culture” – COMM 4560 
A survey of the historical origins and cultural impact of several mass media, including television, film, radio, the Internet, and print media. The course aims to increase media literacy through analysis of specific media products as well as discussion of broad topics such as: advertising and commercialization; politics and censorship; gender, race, and social identity
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“Language and Culture” – COMM 4620 
This course examines the role that language plays in the production of social identities and cultural assumptions about the world. Course topics include: language and worldview; linguistic contact and change, language ideology and nationalism, religious language, “politically correct” speech, and the key role that language plays in structuring race, gender and class-based systems of social inequality. Guest lectures from the Languages faculty.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“User-Centered Design” – COMM 4770 
Explore how users get involved in design: as specifiers of requirements, as evaluators, as sounding boards, and as collaborators. Students will gather requirements, design to meet those requirements, and evaluate their success.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“Design for Global Society” – COMM 4960/6960 
In this course, students use semiotics to interpret images that permeate culture and impact the way people think and behave. Visual and verbal assignments enforce their ability to communicate how designed images either instill or enforce values and propagate ideas; fieldwork allows graduate students to gather data to test their image hypotheses. Special emphasis is placed on developing students’ awareness and understanding of images from Western and non-Western cultures.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“Character and Story for Games” –COMM 4960 
Course is designed as a multiplayer game. It teaches history, culture and literature while preparing students to confront the unique challenges in writing for Games. Students are required to be collaborative and empathetic; to be aware citizens of the world; and to ask themselves why they are making games: how do those games touch hearts and minds?
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 
Communication and Media 
“Senior Creative Seminar I” – COMM 4968 
This course is for senior EMAC and ARTS majors, and is the core creative forum for the development and presentation of the Senior Thesis. The course is the first part of a two-semester study provided in two distinct but related parts. The twin components, Senior Creative Seminar I, thesis development, and Senior Creative Seminar II, written thesis and exhibition, are designed to guide the senior student through the thesis process and ultimately an exhibition of their work.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction” – ITWS 2210 
An introduction to the current theories, methods, and issues in human-computer interaction. Theory and research along with practical application are discussed within the context of organizational impact. The course provides the knowledge of HCI systems and research used for the implementation of safe, quick, and useable interactive technologies.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“Chinese I” – LANG 1410 
This course is designed to provide students with fundamental skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Mandarin Chinese. Oral and aural skills will be emphasized. Background on Chinese culture will be introduced as an element of the course. By the end of the course, students demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the practice and perspectives of Chinese culture. In addition, students use Chinese language (appropriate to their level of proficiency) both within and beyond the school setting.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“Chinese II” – LANG 1420 
This is a continuation of Chinese I, a course for the standard modern Chinese language (Mandarin). Students learn more Chinese characters and words, reach a total of near 500 characters and 650 words, and use more complicated grammatical structures, including some compliment phrases and topic-comment sentences. In sum, students will learn more in all four aspects – listening, speaking, reading, and writing – presented in Chinese I.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“The Graphic Novel” – LITR 2961 
The graphic novel has emerged as a significant new voice within contemporary literature. This course traces the emergence of the genre from 19th century newspaper inserts, DC Comics’ superheroes and the underground commix movement to Art Spiegel man’s Pulitzer Prize winning holocaust narrative, Mauls, and historical narrative and non-fiction works. We will examine a number of interlocking themes such as the holocaust, the world of the postmodern teenager, gender relations, and crime.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“Film Theory” – LITR 4410 
The purpose of this course is to study significant theories of representation that analyze the visual codifications generically called “film.” The course will examine theories of visual rhetoric and of narrativity; look at the way economic and technological factors have affected the construction of cinematic codes, styles, and trends; examine influential psychoanalytic theories and feminist theories; and consider the ways in which popular films participate in the cultural narratives specific to their moment of production.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“Writing for Classroom and Career” – WRIT 1110 
This course emphasizes written, visual, and oral communication strategies that will help students succeed in both academic and professional contexts. Principal assignments are based on types of writing required in school and on the job: reporting, evaluating, taking a position, and making a proposal (orally and in writing). Written assignments will include visual elements such as headings, charts/graphs, and page or screen design.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“Rhetoric and Writing” – WRIT 2110 
This course teaches expository and persuasive writing. Study of rhetorical theory and critical reading of speeches and/or essays help students to understand the rhetorical process, to analyze the audience, and to foresee its response. An assignment is to interview someone who lived through an experience that has social ramifications (including but not limited to an historical event, a natural disaster, or immigration) and writing a profile of them in the context of the event.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“Creative Writing: Poetry” – WRIT 2310 
This course is for students with little or no previous creative writing experience. Readings introduce traditional, modern, and post-modern poetic practice emphasizing imagery, figurative language, voice, line, and other formal aspects of poetry. The course includes a unit on Slam poetry, also known as Spoken Word poetry, which is expressive and reflective of identity politics in contemporary American society.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Communication and Media 
“Proposing and Persuading” – WRIT 6550/4550 
Make things happen: start a business, raise funds, solicit work, support research. This course teaches students how to write proposals that persuade. Students learn to turn situations into occasions for proposing, write a variety of proposals, locate Request for Proposals, develop a workplan for feasible projects that come in on-time and on-budget, use networks to strengthen proposals, detail a budget, and edit for clarity and grace.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Economics 
“Introductory Economics” – ECON 1200 
Every society faces the questions of choosing how to use its natural and human resources to produce goods and services and how to distribute these resources among its people. This course studies how these choices are made in markets. It also explains the determinants of total output, employment, and inflation. Attention may also be given to special topics such as the environment, trade, and population.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Economics 
“International Economics and Globalization” – ECON 4190 
This course investigates the significance of economic globalization, covering the following topics: international trade and financial flows, technological innovation and intellectual property, technology transfer, national government and transnational corporations, natural resources, health and the environment, impacts on selected industries and countries, and roles of the world trade organization and international monetary fund. The major controversies surrounding globalization are identified, and alternative arguments are evaluated based on available evidence.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Economics 
“Economy, Technology, and Sustainability” – ECON 4250 
Ecological economics is concerned with the relationship between economic systems, technological innovation, social institutions, and resources and pollution in the physical world. The course draws on contemporary ideas and research in several fields, with grounding in economics. It adopts a systems perspective for analyzing local and global challenges and approaches to addressing them.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Sustainability Studies/Economics “Environment and Resource Economics” – ECON 4260 Introduces students to the basic analytical approaches to environmental issues and natural resource use. Emphasis is on economic valuation and public policy. Covers traditional approaches based on assumptions of economic rationality and market efficiency as well as current approaches from the fields of environmental science behavioral economics. Emphasis is on active student participation and examination of current environmental controversies.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
IHSS/Science and Technology Studies 
“IT and Society” IHSS 1220 
Will IT increase prosperity? For whom? What role should governments play in IT development? Do corporations have new responsibilities in the Information Era? What about IT professionals? This course explores the issues, the arguments, and working solutions.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
IHSS 
“PDI Design Studio I – IHSS 1610 This course introduces students to general design through a series of short projects. The projects stress creative thinking and invention, observation and perception, communication and visualization, sketching, photography, model-making, and especially open-ended exploration.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
IHSS/Cognitive Science 
“Minds and Machines” – IHSS 1964 
How is ‘smart’ technology going to change the world and ourselves? Are brain-computer interfaces going to change the way we think and make decisions? This course discusses the nature of various kinds of minds (including machine, animal, ‘male’, and ‘female’ minds), explores the prospects of artificial intelligence, and contemplates the rights and responsibilities of any such cognitive agents in historical, social, economic, and political contexts.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
IHSS  
“Environment and Politics” – IHSS 1966
Concerns about the environment have provoked intense and complicated political debate. In this course, we will analyze the issues, challenges and opportunities to protect the environment. In process, we will explore how techniques from the humanities, arts and social sciences advance knowledge, and can inform practical action. Our central focus will be climate change, and we will debate associated questions: Should the United States continue to drill for oil offshore? Should the United States revitalize nuclear power? Should cars and trucks be more fuel-efficient? How hot is solar power? You will participate in a series of class debates, presenting and cross-examining the arguments of key stakeholders. You’ll also work in a group to develop a proposal for a project that responds to concern about climate change. Throughout the course, you will be encouraged to develop (and critically reflect on) your own environmental values and ideas.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
IHSS 
“Nature and Society” – IHSS 1970 
This course focuses on the social, biological and ecological aspects of humans in the natural world. We emphasize critical thinking about where we come from and where we are going. We will learn about how we have used the land in the past, what we do today, and what our prospects are as a species for the twenty-first century. Contemporary issues such as land use, climate change, energy use, and biodiversity loss will be explored through literature, films, and guest lectures. The course is also organized around a series of “ethnographic” exercises that involve both group and individual field work at (historic) sites such as the Erie Canal, Lake George, and elsewhere (including “virtual” trips to remote places). This will allow you to study human habitation and its relationship to nature in a variety of different ecological settings. In addition to being a core seminar for the “Vasudha” living and learning community, this course is a First Year Studies seminar designed to focus on your academic transition to college.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
IHSS  
“Culture’s Scientific Revolution” – IHSS 1978 
How is science different from or similar to other human endeavors? What kind of truths does science produce, and how? How does a science change and develop? Our goal is to develop an understanding of science as a human activity, in a dynamic give-and-take with the rest of the culture, through a collaborative exploration of some of its most dramatic and important “revolutions”: the Scientific Revolution of the 16th-18th centuries, the demise of determinism and absolute space-time in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the Manhattan Project and the re-organization of American science after World War II, and the development of Darwinian evolutionary theory and its lasting social impacts
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
IHSS 
“PDI Design Studio III” – IHSS 2610 
This studio design course focuses on an enriched sense of problem definition through an emphasis on the reach and interconnectedness of technology, and the conditionality of design selection criteria. Its design exercises, readings, and discussion press beyond marginal substitutions toward a broadened sense of possibility from, for example, “hypercars” and human-powered homes to small-scale local agriculture and extreme ecological living systems.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Science and Technology Studies 
“Century of the Gene” – STSH 2410 
This course details the scientific and social history of genetics, from Darwin and Mendel to the Human Genome Project. Special focus areas include: plant and animal breeding in the early twentieth century; eugenics movements in the U.S. and elsewhere; bacterial and fruit fly genetics; the development of molecular biology; the invention of recombinant-DNA technologies; the emergence of the biotechnology industry; the sociobiology controversies; genetics and evolutionary theory; contemporary genomics.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Sustainability Studies
“Drugs in History” – STSH 2940 
This course teaches basic historical, anthropological, and sociological concepts that can be used to make sense of a wide variety of contemporary phenomena students encounter in everyday life. The focus is on analyzing how licit and illicit drugs serve as “technologies” within specific social contexts or subcultures; what drug policy reveals about social, political, and economic organization; and the impacts of biomedical knowledge and practice on specific population groups. The course focuses on the representation of drug use and drug users in popular culture, science and medicine, and history and the social sciences.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Science and Technology Studies 
“Bioethics” – STSH 4250 
This course explores historical perspectives on bioethics through concrete cases and practical problems faced in the design and execution of some of the highest profile biomedical research and most consequential clinical decisions of the twentieth century. Topics include vaccine development; human radiation experiments; new genetic and reproductive technologies; right-to-die, death-with-dignity, and physician-assisted suicide; human experimentation, including prisoners, the sick, and the disabled; neuroethics; animal research; and emergent topics such as stem cell research, prenatal diagnostics, and genetic testing.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Science and Technology Studies 
“Environmental Philosophy” – STSH 4340 
While concepts such as quality of life, environment, nature, global ecology, and the like figure heavily in contemporary discussions, they are seldom integrated into an environmental philosophy. The course tries to achieve this integration by understanding some of the religious, mythic-poetic, and scientific dimensions of the human-nature matrix.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Sustainability Studies 
“Self-Organization in Science & Society” – STSH 4580 Self-organization has become an increasingly important phenomenon in both the natural sciences and engineering. Self-assembly of molecular structure is critical to nanotechnology; self-regulating ecosystems are modeled in biology, and so on. But recursive loops in which things govern themselves are also foundational to society: democracy is the people governing the people; social networks on the internet arise by self-assembly, and many indigenous societies use self-organization to create sustainable ways of life. This course will introduce students to models of self-organization in natural science and engineering, and examine their potential application to society, politics, and ethics.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Science and Technology Studies 
“PDI Design Studio V” – STSH 4610 
PDI studio V focuses on an enriched sense of program and user needs definition through methodologies of the humanities and social sciences. Studio projects, presentations and readings explore the relation of race, class, and gender to technology, and the potential of design to address societal problems. The course has often focused on incorporating information technology in educational tools for low-income primary school students.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Sustainability Studies 
“Sustainability Careers” – STSH 4960 
Advancing environmental sustainability will depend on many kinds of expertise. In this course, students will explore the evolving terrain of green jobs, and diverse sustainability-oriented career pathways they could purse that leverage the expertise they have developed through their undergraduate studies. The course provide students the opportunity to conduct sustained research that examines where sustainability-oriented work is being done, and how people with varied expertise are making a contribution.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Science and Technology Studies 
“Product Design & Innovation Design Studio 6” ENGR/STSH 4961 
This course is the sixth in the PDI studio series.  It introduces students to entrepreneurship, business planning, and project management, all in service of advancing your skills as product innovators.  As with all PDI studios, assignments require students to synthesize social, technical, cultural, and formal concerns in the design of innovative objects, environments, and communications media. As a studio course, class time is used for self-guided design investigations as well as structured group activities.  Students are expected to participate in individual and group research, including hands-on exploration of design ideas; discussions with potential users, researchers, and practitioners; project reviews; and formal presentations.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Science & Technology Studies 
“Science, Technology & Society” – STSH/S 1110 
An introduction to the social, historical, and ethical influences on modern science and technology. Cases include development of the atomic bomb, mechanization of the workplace, Apollo space program, and others. Readings are drawn from history, fiction, and social sciences; films and documentary videos highlight questions about the application of scientific knowledge to human affairs. The class is designed to give students freedom to develop and express their own ideas.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Science and Technology Studies 
“Sustainability Debates” – STSH/S 1961 
In this course, students learn controversy analysis and participate in a series of oral debates about alternative energy, pollution and health, and food and water resources. We also develop proposals for sustainability projects.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCESScience and Technology Studies “A Century of Environmental Thought” – STSH/S 2310 This course examines the emergence of environmental consciousness in the United States throughout the 20th century. Students in this course will study the original writings of some of the most important thinkers and activists in the history of environmentalism, examine the social contexts in which their ideas formed, and consider their relevance to contemporary sustainability issues.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Sustainability Studies 
“Public Service Internship” – STSH/S 4800 
This course offers insight into the public, policy process from the vantage point of a part-time internship in the public or private sector as well as an opportunity to explore a career option before actually embarking upon it. The following is a partial list of the large number of possible internships: airport planning, architecture, banking, biological research, clinical psychology, computer science, consumer protection, corporate management, engineering, environmental planning, geology, local government, materials and mechanical engineering, noise pollution abatement, personnel management review, premedical, public finance and taxation, public health management, public relations, social work, state legislature, stock market, transportation planning, and urban planning.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Science and Technology Studies 
“Senior Project” – STSH/S 4980 
This class is designed to support the development of STS senior thesis projects. Independent research supervised by a faculty member,   culminating in a written thesis. A creative endeavor such as a videotape or computer program may be substituted with departmental permission. This is a communication-intensive course.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Science and Technology Studies 
“Design, Culture and Society” – STSS 2210 
This course allows students to develop a critical understanding of the relationships between design, culture, and society. ‘Design’ is defined broadly, touching on product/industrial design, urban design, and so-called alternative design approaches such as ecological and feminist design.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Sustainability Studies 
“Environment and Society” – STSS 2300 
The course’s main theme is ecological sustainability: what it is, how it might be achieved, how it can be maintained. The theory and practice of sustainability are explored in three parts: through an examination of the concepts, actors, and processes of society-environment interactions; through an analysis of environmental philosophies and models for action; and by addressing the problems of and prospects for building sustainable societies.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 
Science and Technology Studies  
“American Politics and Society in Crisis” – STSS 2430 
Central features of American life once renowned for their quality and integrity – factories, schools, infrastructure, media, criminal justice, and political democracy itself — are increasing prominent as sites of dysfunction, inequality and decline. The class will study the underlying causes of these overlapping crises and possibilities for reform. Careful reading of works in social and political analysis will be supplemented with study of the everyday tragedies depicted in “The Wire.”
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Sustainability Studies 
“Environment and Law” – STSS 2960 
What U.S. and international laws protect the environment? Who is involved in the design and enforcement of these laws? What landmark cases shape the way people think about environmental law? How could law better protect the environment and advance sustainability? This course examines these questions to the legal context and grounding of diverse sustainability issues.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Sustainability Studies 
“Food, Farms, & Famine” – STSS 4260 
This course provides students with a wide-ranging understanding of the environmental and social context of food, agriculture, and hunger. Drawing primarily on sociological concepts and research, the class will take a “food systems” approach, analyzing food as it travels from farm to table as part of an interconnected process. Students will examine why we eat the way we do and how our food choices affect other people and the environment.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Science and Technology Studies 
“Professional Development” – STSS 4840 
This class explores technological contexts for leadership, styles and skills of leadership, and different leadership roles. Assignments develop a variety of communication skills. A team-based project gives students the opportunity to demonstrate leadership initiative by proposing solutions to social problems that combine technical expertise with social analysis and communication skills.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Sustainability Studies 
“Sustainability Research Design” – STSS 4961 
This course guides students through research design for a social science thesis, resulting in a thesis proposal and plan of work. The course helps students think about and focus their research goals, and identify sources of data. Students produce extensive research memos every week, which feed into the proposal due at the end of the semester.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Sustainability Studies 
“Oil Politics” – STSS 4962 
Oil undergirds and drives contemporary societies. In this course, we will map the ways we depend on oil the problems associated with oil, and alternative sources of energy. In process, we will extend our thinking about the matrix of problems that make environmental sustainability both difficult, and an urgent priority.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Sustainability Studies 
“STS-Sustainability Research Methods” – STSS 4964 
Students in this course will explore an array of methods used in the social sciences and humanities, developing their capacity to carry out independent and collaborative research.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Sustainability Studies 
“China & the United States” – STSS 4964 
“China and the United States are economic and political giants that have intricate, sometimes troubled relationships as well as deeply interwoven futures.  The course explores a variety of historical, philosophical, social, and political issues that shed light upon prospects for cooperation and conflict between the two superpowers.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Sustainability Studies 
“Sustainability Education” – STSS 4965 
What knowledge and thought styles are needed to advance environmental sustainability? How can educators cultivate the kind of knowledge and thinking needed? How can sustainability educators reach kids of different ages, and different kinds of communities? This course will examine these questions through review of varied ways environmental education can be conceptualized and delivered. The course will also provide opportunities for creative development of educational materials and outreach.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Science and Technology Studies 
“Senior Project” – STSS 4980 
Ordinarily consists of independent research, supervised by a faculty member, culminating in a written thesis. A creative endeavor such as a videotape or computer program may be substituted with departmental permission.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES, ARTS, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Sustainability Studies 
“Sustainability Practicum”  – SUST  
Variable credit course for students involved in action learning — through work on projects with Engineers for a Sustainable World, for example, or with other student groups. Students will gain course credit for hours logged with a project, and will do social science reading and research that relates to and helps advance their projects. Their findings will be presented as a written report, and in an oral presentation at the STS Undergraduate Research Symposium.
Courses are listed by discipline with one sentence description of CESR component and any CBL component.
Architecture | Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences | Science | Engineering | Management
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Genetic Engineering” – BCBP 4310 
Social responsibility and ethics is a pervading theme in the genetic engineering course. Discussions of topics such as bioengineered foods and gene therapy focus not only on “what is possible” but also on the “pros and cons”. In particular, we discuss unintended consequences that have occurred as the result of genetic engineering (e.g. death during gene therapy trial).
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Sequence Analysis” – BCBP 4540 
As term projects, students are asked to analyze genetic diversity within a narrow range of species. They are asked to report on biodiversity and how human activities may have affected species diversity. This helps students become more aware of human impacts on the environment.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Molecular Modeling” – BCBP 4550 
As term projects, students are asked to design a new protein drug and dock it to a receptor. As a case study we investigate cocaine addiction and how protein-based drugs may be used to treat addiction. The economics of drug research and the pharmaceutical industry’s bias towards late stage disease over early stage and prevention, towards treating the symptoms versus curing the disease, are discussed from an ethical point of view.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Proteomics” – BCBP 4640 
Characterization of patterns and changes in patterns of protein expression with development, aging, and disease. Relevant emerging technologies and their application to global grand challenges are discussed.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Biochemistry Laboratory” – BCBP 4710 
Each student must document their work using the Scientific method in their notebooks. They must describe their work in detail and be honest about when the data is collected. The students must be able to communicate their results in simple terms for the general public and scientists outside their field.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Molecular Biochemistry I” – BCBP 4760 
Class discusses the fundamental principles of biochemistry. Examples of aberrations in metabolic pathways in human diseases are given and potential solutions discussed.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Molecular Biochemistry II” – BCBP 4770 
The focus of the second semester of Molecular Biochemistry focuses on metabolic pathways and their relationship to human health and disease. Scott Bello is a practicing physician and does an excellent job of connecting the science with the clinic i.e., “From Bench to Bedside.”
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology” – BIOL 2120 
Students are organized into recitation sections and assigned to read and discuss case studies of children with genetic diseases and how they are being treated. For example, we use a study of a girl born with the skin disease epidermolysis bullosa to illustrate the function of the cells and proteins impacted by the mutation, plus discuss the use of artificial skin as a means of treating her condition. One of the assigned papers is written by the parents of a child with this disease, who explain what it is like to raise a child with such fragile skin. In lecture we discuss the impact of cell and molecular biology research on the diagnosis and treatment of this disease.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Genetics and Evolution” – BIOL 2500 
Each student is required to submit a suggestion for a topic beyond the material in the textbook for class discussion which frequently includes social aspects of genetics research or more practical applications of genetics. Each student is required to submit an article related to the impact of genetics research on society or about the life and contributions of a famous genetics researcher, along with a very brief summary of the topic by the student. Selected submissions are also discussed during class.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Stem Cell Laboratory” – BIOL 4020 
Students learn to appreciate that the normal, cancer, and stem cells they use come from real people, both living and dead. They come to understand that they have the cells because cancer patients and healthy volunteers were willing to donate cells for research and educational purposes. This realization and understanding of the source of the cells puts a different spin on their course work, as they think about the fact that these cells are not merely catalog items, but were once part of actual people.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Cancer Cell Research” – BIOL 4060 
The students learn to appreciate that the normal, cancer, and stem cells they use come from real people, both living and dead. They come to understand that they have the cells because cancer patients and healthy volunteers were willing to donate cells for research and educational purposes. This realization and understanding of the source of the cells puts a different spin on their course work, as they think about the fact that these cells are not merely catalog items, but were once part of actual people.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Physician Scientist Program 
“Seminal Developments in Biomedical Research” – BIOL 4090 
This is a course taught by AMC faculty to our Accelerated Physician Scientist majors in spring of their junior year and directly before they enter medical school at AMC in the fall. This course addresses specifically the relationship between research and medicine.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Physician Scientist Program 
“From Neuron to Behavior” – BIOL 4100 
This course discusses the important topics in neuroscience including mechanisms that result in nerve signaling, sensation and movement, how the mature brain can change, and complex brain functions and neurological disease.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Biostatistics” – BIOL 4200 
Includes ethical research and responsible use of data and statistical analyses. We focus on the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment, and the Guatemala STD Experiments as initial examples. We also discuss recent examples of research fraud, as well as the withholding of studies and data by the US government concerning dangerous drugs, toxic industrial chemicals, and consumer goods that are damaging both people and the environment.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Physician Scientist Program 
“Developmental Biology” – BIOL 4250  
Model systems provide the experimental basis to understand the conserved principles of developmental biology that apply to human development and disease.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Advanced Cell Biology” – BIOL 4260 
As part of this course, we discuss the value of basic science research (as opposed to medical research, for example) and the necessity of federal funding for this type of research. We also discuss the value of using model organisms for research on human disease questions — and again, the value of federal funding for this type of research.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Microbiology” – BIOL 4330 
Responsible use of antibiotics -understanding the use of pathogens as possible weapons -the use of microbes in preserving a balance ecosystem -the use of microbes in fighting pollution and diseases.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Cancer Biology” – BIOL 4330 
Students are organized into groups and tasked with defining the essential elements in a topic concerning cancer. Each group is required to give two, week-long presentations on these topics, including developing learning outcomes and assessment methods for demonstrating that the rest of the class achieved the desired outcomes. Examples of presentations that include professional development and real-world problems: (1) Modeling a biotech company competing for startup funds for a new project; the funding rationale has to include justification for broad appeal in the health care field, including affordable costs to customers. (2) Review of published clinical trials to develop an appropriate trial for a new anti-cancer therapy; the protocol must include ethical patient care. (3) Critical evaluation of the metrics used to track professional development in cancer-related research (e.g., h-score, journal impact factor, funding amount/source, etc.); students are tasked with defining the “leaders” of a specific subfield in cancer research and treatment.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Bioterrorism, Biowarfare and Biodefense” BIOL 4400
This course provides the student with an understanding of the biological and physiological differences between the various pathogenic and toxinogenic agents that may be used as agents of terrorism or biowarfare. The strength of a society and hopefulness of an individual is discussed through understanding and knowledge. By reading original literature, weekly internet homework, in-class student presentations, and class discussion, students learn how culture and attitudes towards others can manifest in causing harm and death to those who do not believe or think as they do. Students are exposed to modes of environmental dissemination of agents and countermeasures that constitute biological defense.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Molecular Biology” – BIOL 4620 
Examples of applications of molecular biology to the study of human health are presented in the course. When possible, course material is connected to current events and topics.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Molecular Biology II” – BIOL 4630 
This class focuses on the acquisition and analysis of genomic information. Issues related to human identification and privacy of genetic information are discussed.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Applied and Environmental Microbiology”–BIOL 4680 
This course examines how microorganisms interact with each other and their environment and the environmental perturbations that result because of human activities.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Freshwater Ecology” – BIOL 4700 
This course is a quantitative examination of the major biological fresh water communities and the impact of different stressors on the aquatic ecosystem.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Molecular Biology Advanced Laboratory” – BIOL 4720 
Each student must document their work using the Scientific method in their notebook. They must describe their work in detail and be honest about when the data is collected. A component of this laboratory course stresses the importance of handling reagents carefully and with respect. Each student must be able to trust that the other students are maintaining the enzymatic activity and accuracy of the reagents and not wasting them. It is the shared responsibility of the students to maintain the reagents.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Cell and Developmental Biology Lab” – BIOL 4740 
Model organisms (Drosophila and C. elegans) are used to investigate biological development using tools and techniques that are not ethical if done in humans (e.g. use of developmental mutants and/or transgenic strains).
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Cell-Extracellular Matrix Interaction” – BIOL 4750 
Students are put into groups and tasked with defining the essential elements in a topic related to the course theme.  Examples of professional development and real-world problems include: 1) Applying both basic science and engineering principles to design a strategy for engineering a tissue in the lab; this requires close collaboration between biologists and engineers to create a strategy that satisfies the critical review of their peers; 2) Staging debates on the merits of a research strategy adopted by several research groups; the practicality of the strategy is often criticized by students who have relevant in-field experience, which they share with the rest of the class; 3) Holding a “mock grant review,” modeled on a real review panel meeting, to critique mock grant proposals; this requires awareness of global issues that impact scientific research, and emphasizes the importance of skillful communication between professional peers that hold differing opinions.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Principles of Ecology” – BIOL 4850 
Environmental issues, especially the overexploitation of resources, climate warming, and the looming possibility of the global collapse of ecosystems and their life sustaining services are a focus of this course. These problems are deeply connected to issue of civic engagement and social responsibility and we have a number of focused, structured discussions on both subjects based on readings in socio-political ecology, the tragedy of the commons, the destruction of indigenous people that follows from deforestation, and our individual and collective responsibility to help reduce humanity’s ecological footprint. Students give presentations to the class on an issue of their choice which must include both ecological and human impacts. A final paper is also required that addresses the eco-systemic, economic, and societal implications of the ongoing anthropogenic destruction of the planet.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Biology 
“Evolution” – BIOL 4860 
Course includes a lecture on global human overpopulation. This lecture encourages thinking about this global issue and how it affects our future, with social, political, cultural and evolutionary components.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Computer Science 
“Computer Science I” – CSCI 1100 
One or more of the programming projects done in the course focusses on access to and analysis of Twitter data. This relates to course material to social networking and social issues in general.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Computer Science 
“Machine and Computational Learning” – CSCI 4100 
A component of this course discusses the role of computation in financial issues of interest to society in general.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Computer Science 
“Computational Social Choice” – CSCI 4960 
This course includes a discussion of voting and on-line voting mechanisms.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Computer Science 
“Cloud Computing” – CSCI-6960 
Discussion of the democratization of science, where individuals can choose what projects get allocated to their home computers in massively-parallel scientific search problems.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Earth and Environmental Sciences 
“Structural Geology” – ERTH 2120 
Students learn about the evolution of land forms on which civilization is built and about the analysis of rock failure that leads to earthquakes. Major tectonic zones that affect man-made structures are identified and discussed.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Earth and Environmental Sciences 
“Earth Materials” – ERTH 2330 
Resources (energy, materials, etc.) are essential for the evolution of civilization. Students learn the basic structural and chemical properties of materials, where minerals resources come from, and by what Earth processes these minerals form. Important societal issues involving critical Rare Earth Elements (REEs) are presented and put into context of Earth processes.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Earth and Environmental Sciences 
“Environmental Geology” – ERTH 4180 
Numerous topics that relate to environmental issues are discussed. Examples include the science of climate change, hydrofracking, radioactive waste disposal, and environmental contamination, transport, and remediation.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Earth and Environmental Sciences 
“Earth’s Climate: Past, Present, and Future” – ERTH 4500 
Students learn the science of climate studies and the ways in which climate scientists unravel the Earth’s past climate. This knowledge is put to important societal use in the modeling of climate evolution and the impact this will have on civilization.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Earth and Environmental Sciences 
“Groundwater Hydrology” – ERTH 4710 
Students learn the fundamentals of groundwater flow, aquifer evolution, and water resources. Practical problems involve evaluation of aquifer potential in light of societal requirements.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
Information Technology and Web Science 
“IT & Society” – ITWS 1220 
Will IT increase prosperity? For whom? What role should governments play in IT development? Do corporations have new responsibilities in the Information Era? This course explores the issues, arguments and working solutions. The course examines macro indicators and trends; the microeconomics and politics of specific arenas—the software industry, the automated work place, telemedicine, television; and opportunities for improving society using IT.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE 
Information Technology and Web Sciences 
“Web Science” – ITWS 4200 
Since its inception the World Wide Web has changed the ways people work, play, communicate, collaborate and educate. There is, however, a growing realization among researchers across a number of disciplines that without fundamental understanding of the current, evolving, and potential Web, we may be missing or delaying opportunities for new and revolutionary capabilities. This course attempts to provide the foundations of that understanding, exploring the fundamentals of the World Wide Web’s function including the HTTP protocol, key algorithms that make the Web function, future trends, and social issues with respect to Web use and effect.
Courses are listed by discipline with one sentence description of CESR component and any CBL component.
Architecture | Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences | Science | Engineering | Management
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING  
“How to Change The World” – ENGR 1961 
As the title implies, this course focuses on introducing students to values and skills that will make the world a better place.  
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Biomedical Engineering 
“Biomedical Engineering Design” – BMED 4600 
Many of the projects are in collaboration with the Center for Disability Services in Albany. The students visit the facility and meet with the disabled consumers who will potentially benefit from their projects. We have also used project suggestions from the Engineering World Health organization for our capstone course. These are projects which are intended to help the developing world through engineering solutions. We do at least 2 projects per year from there.
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Chemical Engineering 
“Chemical Process Design” – CHME 4050 
The design of equipment, processes, and systems of interest in chemical engineering through application of scientific, technological, and economic principles. The concepts of product design, design for the environment, and the ethical and safety issues of design are introduced. Emphasis is placed on problem formulation and the conceptual, analytical, and decision aspects of open-ended design situations. The work integrates knowledge and skills gained in previous and concurrent courses. This is a communication-intensive course.
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Civil Engineering 
“Traffic Engineering” – CIVL 4660 
Basic characteristics of traffic flow, including driver, vehicle, volume, speed, delay, capacity, and accidents; traffic regulation and control, signs, markings, signals, and signal systems; basic traffic flow theory; study methods and analysis procedures to solve traffic engineering and control problems.
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Civil Engineering 
“Civil Engineering Capstone Design” – CIVL 4920 
Students learn about the processes of civil engineering design through working on a practical design problem in the City of Troy.  The course is intended to improve the students’ skills in project planning, teamwork, communication and presentation. Teams are assigned to structural-geotechnical tasks, transportation tasks or environmental tasks. TEAM TAUGHT
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering 
“ECSE Design” – ECSE 4900 
A capstone design course. Provides all ECSE majors senior design experience by engaging them in client-sponsored projects. The students work in multidisciplinary teams, jointly responsible to the faculty, the client liaison, and to each other for project management, execution and reporting. Contemporary design tools and practices are emphasized.  TEAM TAUGHT
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering 
“ECSE Honors Enrichment” – ECSE 4960 
This course covers the following topics: Overview and Introduction to Engineering, Innovation, and Economic Development Challenges Electrical and Computer Engineering Grand Challenges Communicating with the Public about Engineering Presidential Policy Briefings: Energy, Climate Change, Space Graduate School, Professional Schools, and other Options, A Random Walk through Technologies and Opportunities Adventures in Electromagnetics Compressed Sensing and Applications Adventures in Smart Lighting Introducing Video Compression.
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Environmental Engineering 
“Environmental Process Design” – ENVE 4180 
The design of equipment, processes, and systems of interest in environmental engineering through application of scientific, technological and economic principles. Emphasis is placed on problem formulation and conceptual, analytical, and decision aspects of open-ended design situations. Students will integrate knowledge and skills gained in previous and concurrent courses, and learn research techniques to find and use resources from the technical literature. Health and safety issues are presented. Professional development topics are presented including professional ethics and registration.  In addition to the actual projects, we require students to attend a public meeting on a proposed engineering design project.
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Environmental Engineering 
“Introduction to Environmental Engineering” ENVE 2110 
Students visit area water and waste water treatment facilities, helping them connect them to real world problems and perspectives.
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Industrial and Systems Engineering 
“Industrial and Management Engineering Design” – ISYE 4270 
This course provides a capstone and professional experience. Student teams work on independent projects in any field of industrial and management engineering approved by a faculty adviser. Typically, projects involve a manufacturing and service sector client who provides the student with an opportunity to gain an actual industrial experience. Memos, progress reports, and a final written and oral report are submitted to the project adviser and client. This course is a communication-intensive course.
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Industrial and Systems Engineering 
“Ethics in Modeling ISE” – ISYE 4310 This course introduces students to past, current, and future issues in the ethics of information technology, and encourages students to develop their own standpoint from which to address the diverse range of ethical challenges facing us in the information age. During the course, students will learn about a wide range of ethical theories, and then will apply these theories to address ethical dilemmas in creating models for decision support using an educational computer simulation.
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Materials Engineering 
“Design and Applications of Materials” – MTLE 4920 
A capstone experience to afford seniors in MS&E the unique and invaluable opportunity to participate as a vital member of a truly multidisciplinary design team (comprised of engineering students from other disciplines, as well as MBAs) and function just as they will as professionals in practice, in preparation for practice. This course acquaints students with all the phases of the design process from recognizing the need through a detailed conceptual design. Students work in teams on a semester-long project with the assistance of faculty consultants. The design projects require students to draw upon their engineering background, experience, and other pertinent resources. Oral and written presentations are required. This is a communication-intensive course.
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 
Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering 
“Inventors Studio” – MANE 4220 
Students work in teams to continue design and development work on approved projects that started in other courses such as Introduction to Engineering Design. New projects can also be proposed by students. Emphasis will be on completing the design, building an improved prototype, applying for patent protection, and licensing the design. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. Oral and written presentations are required. This is a communication-intensive course.
Courses are listed by discipline with one sentence description of CESR component and any CBL component.
Architecture | Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences | Science | Engineering | Management
LALLY SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT
“Management Leadership I” – MGMT 1240 
The overall content focuses on skills, body of knowledge, and theories of leadership development. It involves discussion and practice to give students well-rounded skills necessary for personal and professional success. The course emphasizes the following themes: communication, ethics, values and self-awareness, leadership and followership.
LALLY SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT
“Business Ethics and the Law” – MGMT 1260 
Introduction to the legal, ethical, social, technological, environmental, political, and economic considerations underlying, defining, and creating modern management responsibilities.
LALLY SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT
“Managing Human Resources in High Performance Organizations” – MGMT 4860 
An overview of the way managers and employees successfully use human resources, the talent, strengths and abilities of a company’s workforce, to gain competitive advantage in the marketplace.  Students will learn the theories and practices involved in the management of human resources, including strategic alignment, recruitment, selection, the functions of job design and job analysis, performance appraisal, compensation and reward systems, benefits, career development, and equal employment opportunity.  The external and global environments relevant to human resource management will also be a focus of study.
LALLY SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT
“Social Entrepreneurship” – MGMT 4969 
Social enterprises address the most pressing social problems by employing scalable, self-sustainable and innovative business models. Social entrepreneurship combines good business principles with the desire to solve social problems such as hunger and homelessness, improve the environment, and empower communities. Social entrepreneurs create triple-bottom line companies that do well while doing good. This course teaches the principles of social entrepreneurship using a variety of approaches from podcasts and conversations with entrepreneurs who are running socially motivated businesses ranging from the smallest and most localized efforts to large and ambitious enterprises. It is designed to inspire and prepare you with sophisticated advice as to how you can make social entrepreneurship a part of your own life.